Microsoft in the Classroom

Inking and thinking

Inking Your Thinking: Case studies in innovation with Microsoft Surface

Inking Your Thinking Report

The Inking Your Thinking project was conducted in 2014, in partnership with the Victorian Department of Education and Training, Victoria University and Microsoft. This study took place in three Victorian government schools where students in Kindergarten, Year 2 and Years 7 and 8 were provided with access to Surface devices.

The case studies in this report were designed to explore the potential of the new technology and document the innovative ways in which the Surface could be integrated in classrooms across the four levels of schooling.

Access the full Inking Your Thinking Report

Access the Inking Your Thinking Report Summary

Writing with a digital pen

What:

If you have a touch device with a digital stylus you can use your stylus to draw or write directly on the screen when using Office programs. This is a great way to illustrate something you are talking about when showing a PowerPoint presentation, or to highlight something the class mentions during a lesson.

Digital Pen in Microsoft Office

Why:

  • You could prepare slides for students to complete, draw on or label by using the stylus on your tablet or pen on an interactive whiteboard.
  • When students hand in homework or draft essays in Word, you can write your feedback directly onto the document - if homework is stored in Office 365, students will see your comments as soon as you have made them.
  • You can also write directly onto Excel, for example annotating and highlighting features of a graph or chart.

How:

  • Use a device with a digitised stylus.
  • You can select between different kinds of pens and colours by clicking the pen button on the presentation menu bar.

'Ink to Text' and 'Ink to Math'

What:

In OneNote students can make notes using a digital stylus and click the 'Ink to Text' button to quickly convert their handwriting to text. This can then be easily copied and pasted into any other program - so students do not need to make notes only to type them up again later.

Inking Maths

Why:

  • Similarly students can use 'Ink to Math' to write equations and formulas without having to fiddle around with equation editors and symbols - just write it out and OneNote will convert it to type for you.

How:

  • Open OneNote.
  • Using your digitised stylus, click on Draw > Ink to Math or Ink to text.

Dock to Desktop

What:

Dock to Desktop is great for keeping your notes on top of other programs. It also enables you to make Linked Notes, which is very helpful for research and revision.

Dock to Desktop

Why:

  • As you take notes in your 'docked' notebook, OneNote will automatically add links to the documents (e.g. PowerPoint and Word files) and websites you are viewing as you write your notes. When you review your notes you can easily follow the links (you will see icons for e.g. PowerPoint or Internet Explorer) to the original documents for further information.

How:

  • Open OneNote click on View Tab > Dock to Desktop.

Resources:

Sharon Oviatt Research Paper: Pen? Keyboard? Voice? Touch?

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